24 Item(s)

per page

24 Item(s)

per page

Tapestry Upholstery Fabric

Tapestry is a heavy textile with a woven design; used for curtains and upholstery. Most weavers use a naturally based warp thread such as linen wool or cotton. The weft threads are usually wool or cotton, but may include silk, gold, silver, or other alternatives.  Tapestry is weft-faced weaving, in which all the warp threads are hidden in the completed work, therefore, could be used on the reversed side, if preferred but a secondary choice. Tapestry fabrics are also described as Jacquard because until the 1990's it used to be woven on a jacquard loom.  A lot of tapestries are reproductions of the famous tapestries of the Middle Ages.  Also shades of same colour woven with a pattern, or many colours and decorative.

History

Tapestries have been found to have a Greek influence in the ancient world.  Samples of Greek tapestry have been found preserved in the desert dating from the 3rd century BC. Tapestry reached a new stage in Europe in the early fourteenth century AD. The production originated in Germany and Switzerland.  Over time, the craft expanded to France and the Netherlands. In the 14th and 15th centuries,  Arras, France was a thriving textile town. The industry specialised in fine wool tapestries which were sold to decorate palaces and castles all over Europe.  In the French revolution hundreds were burnt to recover the gold thread. Arras is still used to refer to a rich tapestry no matter where it was woven. By the 16th century, Flanders, the towns of Oudenaarde, Brussels, Geraardsbergen and Enghein had become the centre of European tapestry production. In the 17th century Flemish tapestries were the most important produced for the intricate detail of pattern and colour.  In the 19th century, William Morris, re-introduced the art of tapestry-making in the medieval style at Merton Abbey.  Also Morris & Co. made successful series of tapestries for home and church uses.

We sell both fire retardant fabrics and fabrics that are not fire retardant. Some fabrics, whilst being suitable for upholstery with regards to fabric weight, it may require treating to the relevant British Safety Standard if you are to use your chosen fabric to cover furniture or other items in the home. Alternatively you could use a flame retardant barrier cloth with your chosen fabric when doing upholstery.

We always recommend that you dry clean our tapestry upholstery fabrics at a specialist dry cleaners.

All our tapestry fabrics are available both online and in store from our fabric warehouse in Northamptonshire.